March 14, 2008

Gen. Gene Renuart, Commander Of U.S. Northern Command Says Uniformed Military Personnel Keep People Calm During Events In The Homeland


Gen. Gene Renuart, commander of U.S. Northern Command, speaks to attendees of the 2008 Joint Emergency Preparedness Liaison Officer Workshop on March 4, 2008, in Miami, Fla. More than 600 Emergency Preparedness Liaison Officers from the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps and Coast Guard attended the weeklong conference. Known as EPLOs, these officers become familiar with local and state response plans and advise states and regions on the capabilities of their services.


CantonTruth Analysis: Hurricane Katrina was a disaster. The Federal government declared Martial Law taking firearms from citizens violating the 4th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. They took firearms from people in dry places and with no way to protect their families made them vulnerable to looters and other crimes. The Federal Government should never have power over State and Local governments even during emergencies. FEMA then gave poison trailers to New Orleans people to live in. But the government loves you and keeps you safe. Yeah Right. This is open announcement of a martial law plan using legislation already in place. The John Warner Defense Authorization Act, PDD 51 and Homeland Security Decision Directive 20. Wake up America before its to late.


USNORTHCOM Works Toward Greater Jointness In Civil Support Operations

March 12, 2008

By Patti Bielling
U.S. Army North Public Affairs

Jointness is the way of the future for civil support operations, said the four-star commander in charge of homeland defense and civil support in the continental United States.

Air Force Gen. Gene Renuart, commander of U.S. Northern Command, spoke about the way ahead for civil support operations on March 4 while addressing more than 600 attendees of the 2008 Joint Emergency Preparedness Liaison Officer Workshop in Miami.

“We want to infuse the joint perspective into the program,” Renuart said as he discussed the command’s desire to shape the future of the Emergency Preparedness Liaison Officer program.

He also announced the formation of a new working group to study and recommend policy, guidance and organizational structure changes to the program.

“We need to take a joint warfighter approach as we respond to events in the homeland,” he said. “We see that when there’s a disaster and people see someone in uniform, they have a feeling of confidence and calm because they understand that (the Department of Defense) is there to assist in the response.”

It’s because the American people expect a prompt, integrated response to a disaster that Northern Command added “anticipate” to its mission statement, Renuart said. What may seem like a small change in wording actually requires a huge culture shift for DoD, he said.

“The focus is to continue to create a coherent planning process,” he said. “As part of the process, we are thinking about the first response on the ground, then the state capabilities and the (emergency support agreements between states), and we think about it all the way up to the federal level so that we can make the response seamless to the people who need help.”

The planning process includes identifying gaps that exist at each of the state and federal levels and anticipating the support that DoD might be asked to provide. And the active-duty Defense Coordinating Officers and the reserve component Emergency Preparedness Liaison Officers serve as “the eyes and ears” on the ground to provide an understanding of the state capabilities and requirements, Renuart said.

More than 600 Emergency Preparedness Liaison Officers from the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps and Coast Guard attended the weeklong conference. Known as EPLOs, these officers become familiar with local and state response plans, and they advise states and regions on the capabilities of their services.

They work closely with U.S. Army North’s 10 Defense Coordinating Officers. These officers and a small staff of Soldiers and civilians are located in each of the Federal Emergency Management Area regions to coordinate defense support of civil authorities.

Sgt. 1st Class Charles McQueen listened to the general’s remarks and said EPLOs and the DCOs recognize the need for joint operations. McQueen served as one of the Minnesota Emergency Preparedness Liaison Officers on the ground in August following the I -35 West bridge collapse in Minneapolis, Minn. The Department of Defense deployed personnel, in support of the sheriff, leading the response to recover the victims’ remains effectively and respectfully.

“(The state National Guard, EPLOs and Region V DCO) exercise together and stay engaged with the state at the tactical level,” McQueen said. “I think we need to continue to work to increase jointness not only among the services, but also with all of our federal and state partners.”

Because many of the policies, guidance and laws governing defense support of civil authorities predate the founding of U.S. Northern Command, Renuart said he will be working to affect legislative and policy changes to increase joint training, planning and operations.

Air Force Col. Michael Hare will play a role in the evolving program as the director of Air Force North National Security and Emergency Preparation. He said that attendees received a glimpse of what the future holds for all the services.

“There’s a lot of work to be done as we establish the best way for local, state and federal agencies to work together and serve the American people,” Hare said. “It’s very a gratifying mission to be working to improve homeland defense.”

Renuart said that the American people deserve nothing less than unity of effort from the services and components.

“I think it’s the right thing to do for our country,” Renuart said. “My mother lives in California, and when fires threaten her home or when hurricanes threaten somewhere else, we want Americans to have a sense that we’re there to help them. I don’t want to get a call from my mom saying, ‘You’re not doing your job.’ That’s the approach each of you needs to have.

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